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Real Questions From
The USource® HR Hotline

Termination - We plan to terminate an employee at the end of the day. Do we have to give them their final paycheck at the termination discussion? In general, state law dictates what is... Read more

Part-Time HR Person - HR is only one of several hats I wear here at First State. How can I possibly keep up on all the latest changes in state and federal employment law? USource provides training for you through our... Read more

Compliance - Right now I'm in compliance with banking regulations. But what about state and federal employment laws? We ensure that your employee manual... Read more

Disciplinary Meeting - I've been asked to talk to a teller who often arrives late and takes personal calls while at work. But I've never held a meeting like this. The first step you must take... Read more

Leaves of Absence - Our data entry person has asked for a leave of absence to deal with a serious family issue. What are his rights, and how do I administer a leave? We will provide you... Read more

Wage and Hour Laws - Do I have to give my employees a lunch break if they only work seven hours? Federal law does not require... Read more

Answers to Your Hotline Questions

Termination

Q. We plan to terminate an employee at the end of the day. Do we have to give them their final paycheck at the termination discussion?

A. In general, state law dictates what is required in this situation. For example, North Dakota employers must pay discharged employees within 15 days of separation or on the next regular payday, whichever comes first. Any accrued and unused vacation time that has been promised the employee should also be paid at termination.

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Part-Time HR Person

Q. HR is only one of several hats I wear here at First State. How can I possibly keep up on all the latest changes in state and federal employment law?

A. USource provides training for you through our quarterly seminars and newsletter. We send Alerts out via e-mail if a change requires your immediate attention with our suggested action. We also update your employee manual as needed or requested. And we are available through e-mail and via our Hotline for any questions you may have.

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Compliance

Q. Right now I'm in compliance with banking regulations. But what about state and federal employment laws?

A. We ensure that your employee manual is in compliance with federal and state employment laws. Our electronic HR library provides you with clearly written summaries of important employment laws.

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Disciplinary Meeting

Q. I've been asked to talk to a teller who often arrives late and takes personal calls while at work. But I've never held a meeting like this.

A. The first step you must take is to prepare for the meeting. Gather your facts including documentation of the number of times the teller has been tardy and by how much, and an estimate or an example of personal phones calls. It is important that the employee understands that his or her behavior must improve or they will be subject to further disciplinary actions.

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Leaves of Absence

Q. Our data entry person has asked for a leave of absence to deal with a serious family issue. What are his rights, and how do I administer a leave?

A. We will provide you with recommended leave policies for your handbook. For example, the employee may have rights under state specific statutes, or, if you have more than 50 employees in a 75-mile radius, the employee may have rights under the Family Medical Leave Act. As always, call the Hotline for help interpreting the policies or laws for your specific situation.

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Wage and Hour Laws

Q. Do I have to give my employees a lunch break if they only work seven hours?

A. Federal law does not require that you give employees paid or unpaid rest or meal breaks. However, several states have some type of rest or meal break requirement, so it depends on what state you are located in. For example, in Minnesota, employers must permit employees who work eight hours or more "sufficient time to eat a meal." So, at least in Minnesota, you are not required to give an employee who only works seven hours a lunch break.

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